torn meniscus in knee recovery time

🔥+ torn meniscus in knee recovery time 04 Aug 2020 Acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) has been shown to help some people with osteoarthritis who have mild to moderate pain. Taking more than ...Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting millions of people worldwide. It occurs when the protective cartilage that cushions ...

torn meniscus in knee recovery time The causes of osteoarthritis of the hip are not all known. Factors that may contribute include: Joint injury. This may result from repeated movements or damage ...

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By James Bried, MD and Brad Cohen, MD and Thomas Knutson, MD
  |  
for 1 last update 2020/08/04

torn meniscus in knee recovery timehow to torn meniscus in knee recovery time for There is a range of pain medications available to relieve arthritic and musculoskeletal pain, as well as post-surgical pain. In general, drugs that relieve pain are called analgesics or, more commonly, painkillers. These drugs vary in potency and in how they work, and can be administered in different ways, including via pills, skin patches, injections, or intravenously.

See How to Understand Chronic Pain vs. Acute Pain

Analgesics are frequently divided into two categories: opioids and non-opioids.

  • Opioids are often referred to as narcotics
  • Non-opioids include both non-steroidal the 1 last update 2020/08/04 anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen

Opioids

Analgesics are frequently divided into two categories: opioids and non-opioids.
  • Opioids are often referred to as narcotics
  • Non-opioids include both non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen

Opioids

Commonly called narcotics, opioid analgesics include medications derived from naturally occurring opiates (e.g. codeine and morphine) as well as man-made opioids (e.g. oxycodone). This group of drugs provides fast and effective pain relief and is usually reserved for treatment of severe pain. Demerol, OxyContin, and Vicodin are all name-brand examples of opioid analgesics.

While these drugs for 1 last update 2020/08/04 play a crucial role in medical pain relief, they carry risks and side effects. For example: While these drugs play a crucial role in medical pain relief, they carry risks and side effects. For example:

  • Opioids can make patients feel foggy and drowsy, as well as cause constipation, itching, and nausea.

  • See Coping with Constipation Caused by Opioid Medication

  • Patients taking opioids to relieve chronic pain will develop a tolerance to the drugs over time, meaning that their bodies require higher doses to achieve the same level of pain relief.
  • Narcotics, or opioids, can be addictive, particularly to people who have had addiction problems in the past.1

Patients are advised to research the potential risks and side effects of opioids, especially if taking them for more than a one- or two-week period.

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NSAIDs and Acetaminophen

Non-opioid analgesics used to treat arthritis and musculoskeletal pain include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and acetaminophen.

NSAIDs
NSAIDs are designed to reduce inflammation and relieve mild to moderate pain. Depending on their formula, NSAIDs are available over the counter or by prescription. For example, the NSAIDs ibuprofen is sold under the brand name Advil, and naproxen is sold under the brand name Aleve, and they are sold in prescription-strength formulas.

Most NSAIDs block COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes.

  • COX-1 enzymes influence blood clotting and the health of the stomach lining
  • COX-2 enzymes influence inflammation that can lead to pain

A special class of NSAIDs block only COX-2 enzymes. Called COX-2 inhibitors, these drugs are less likely to affect blood clotting or cause harm to the stomach. Sold only with a prescription, COX-2 inhibitors include celecoxib, which is sold under the brand name Celebrex.

NSAIDs can cause side effects, most commonly stomach discomfort, heartburn, diarrhea, or constipation. There is also some evidence that NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors may interfere with bone healing, an obvious concern for patients undergoing joint replacement surgery.

Acetaminophen
Another non-opioid analgesic commonly used to treat musculoskeletal pain is acetaminophen. Acetaminophen does not address inflammation, but rather it works by interfering with the brain''s Top Picks

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