Arthritis Cure

🔥+ Arthritis Cure 25 May 2020 Learn more about how the inflammation associated with RA can impact organs ... Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic disease, meaning it can affect many ... Having a chronic disease like arthritis affects many aspects of daily living and can ...

Arthritis Cure Gout is actually a form of arthritis. It is the body's reaction to irritating crystal deposits in the joints. The pain can be intense, but treatment usually ...

News & Perspective
Drugs & Diseases
CME & Education
Academy
Video

Specialty: Multispecialty
Edition: ENGLISH DEUTSCH ESPAÑOL FRANÇAIS PORTUGUÊS

No Results

    No Results

      Wednesday, April 29, 2020
      Arthritis Curehow to Arthritis Cure for for 1 last update 2020/05/25 closeclose
      Please confirm that you would like to log out of Medscape. If you log out, you will be required to enter your username and password the next time you visit. Log out Cancel
      https://profreg.medscape.com/px/getpracticeprofile.do?method=getProfessionalProfile&urlCache=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cubWVkc2NhcGUuY29tL2Fuc3dlcnMvMTAwNzI3Ni00MzA2Mi93aGF0LWFyZS10aGUtc2lnbnMtYW5kLXN5bXB0b21zLW9mLXN5c3RlbWljLW9uc2V0LWp1dmVuaWxlLWlkaW9wYXRoaWMtYXJ0aHJpdGlzLWppYQ==

      processing....

      Updated: Jul 25, 2019
      • Author: David D Sherry, MD; Chief Editor: Lawrence K Jung, MD  more...
      • Share
      • Email
      • Arthritis Curehow to Arthritis Cure for Print
      • Feedback
      Answer

      Systemic-onset JIA is characterized by spiking fevers, typically occurring once or twice each day, at about the same time of day, with temperature returning to normal or below normal. The fever pattern is very useful because infections, Kawasaki disease, and malignancy usually do not have such a predictable pattern.

      Systemic-onset JIA is usually accompanied by an evanescent rash (lasting a few hours), which is typically nonpruritic, macular, and salmon colored on the trunk and extremities. Occasionally, the rash is extremely pruritic and resistant to antihistamine treatment.


      Did this answer your question?
      Additional feedback? (Optional)
      Thank you for your feedback!

      Arthritis Curehow to Arthritis Cure for Related Questions:

         
        References
        1. American College of Rheumatology, Subcommittee on Rheumatoid Arthritis Guidelines. Guidelines for the management of rheumatoid arthritis: 2002 Update. Arthritis Rheum. 2002 Feb. 46(2):328-46. [Medline].

        2. Beukelman T, Patkar NM, Saag KG, Tolleson-Rinehart S, Cron RQ, Dewitt EM, et al. 2011 American College of Rheumatology recommendations for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Initiation and safety monitoring of therapeutic agents for the treatment of arthritis and systemic features. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2011 Apr. 63(4):465-82. [Medline].

        3. Lamer S, Sebag GH. MRI and ultrasound in children with juvenile chronic arthritis. Eur J Radiol. 2000 Feb. 33(2):85-93. [Medline].

        4. Argyropoulou MI, Margariti PN, Karali A, Astrakas L, Alfandaki S, Kosta P, et al. Temporomandibular joint involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging signs. Eur Radiol. 2009 Mar. 19(3):693-700. [Medline].

        5. Lee EY, Sundel RP, Kim S, Zurakowski D, Kleinman PK. MRI findings of juvenile psoriatic arthritis. Skeletal Radiol. 2008 Nov. 37(11):987-96. [Medline].

        6. Barton A, Worthington J. Genetic susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis: an emerging picture. Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Oct 15. 61(10):1441-6. [Medline].

        7. Hinks A, Ke X, Barton A, Eyre S, Bowes J, Worthington J, et al. Association of the IL2RA/CD25 gene with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Jan. 60(1):251-7. [Medline]. [Full Text].

        8. Yanagimachi M, Miyamae T, Naruto T, Hara T, Kikuchi M, Hara R, et al. Association of HLA-A(*)02:06 and HLA-DRB1(*)04:05 with clinical subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. J Hum Genet. 2011 Mar. 56(3):196-9. [Medline].

        9. Ombrello MJ, Remmers EF, Tachmazidou I, et al. HLA-DRB1*11 and variants of the MHC class II locus are strong risk factors for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Dec 29. 112 (52):15970-5. [Medline].

        10. Scola MP, Imagawa T, Boivin GP, Giannini EH, Glass DN, Hirsch R, et al. Expression of angiogenic factors in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: correlation with revascularization of human synovium engrafted into SCID mice. Arthritis Rheum. 2001 Apr. 44(4):794-801. [Medline].

        11. Arthritis Curehow to Arthritis Cure for Wittkowski H, Frosch M, Wulffraat N, Goldbach-Mansky R, Kallinich T, Kuemmerle-Deschner J, et al. S100A12 is a novel molecular marker differentiating systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis from other causes of fever of unknown origin. Arthritis Rheum. 2008 Dec. 58(12):3924-31. [Medline]. [Full Text].

        12. Ayaz NA, Ozen S, Bilginer Y, Ergüven M, Taskiran E, Yilmaz E, et al. MEFV mutations in systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Rheumatology (Oxford). 2009 Jan. 48(1):23-5. [Medline].

        13. Harrison P. Antibiotics in Children Increase Risk for for 1 last update 2020/05/25 Juvenile Arthritis. Medscape Medical News. Available at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/835110. Accessed: November 22, 2014.Harrison P. Antibiotics in Children Increase Risk for Juvenile Arthritis. Medscape Medical News. Available at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/835110. Accessed: November 22, 2014.

        14. Helmick CG, Felson DT, Lawrence RC, Gabriel S, Hirsch R, Kwoh CK, et al. Estimates of the prevalence for 1 last update 2020/05/25 of arthritis and other rheumatic conditions in the United States. Part I. Arthritis Rheum. 2008 Jan. 58(1):15-25. [Medline]. [Full Text].Helmick CG, Felson DT, Lawrence RC, Gabriel S, Hirsch R, Kwoh CK, et al. Estimates of the prevalence of arthritis and other rheumatic conditions in the United States. Part I. Arthritis Rheum. 2008 Jan. 58(1):15-25. [Medline]. [Full Text].

        15. Orphanet. Enthesitis-related arthritis. Available at http://www.orpha.net/consor/cgi-bin/OC_Exp.php?lng=EN&Expert=85438.

        16. Sullivan DB, Cassidy JT, Petty RE. Pathogenic implications of age of onset in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis Rheum. 1975 May-Jun. 18(3):251-5. [Medline].

        17. Simard JF, Neovius M, Hagelberg S, Askling J. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and risk of cancer: a nationwide cohort study. Arthritis Rheum. 2010 Dec. 62(12):3776-82. [Medline].

        18. Ostring GT, Singh-Grewal D. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis in the new world of biologics. J Paediatr Child Health. 2013 May 6. [Medline].

        19. Leegaard A, Lomholt JJ, Thastum M, Herlin T. Decreased Pain Threshold in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Cross-sectional Study. J Rheumatol. 2013 May 1. [Medline].

        20. Cassidy J, Kivlin J, Lindsley C, Nocton J. Ophthalmologic examinations in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Pediatrics. 2006 May. 117(5):1843-5. [Medline].

        21. Lovell DJ. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Clinical Features. Kippel JH, Stone JH, Crofford LJ, White PH, Eds. Primer the 1 last update 2020/05/25 on the Rheumatic Diseases. 13th Ed. Springer Science, New York: 2008. Lovell DJ. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Clinical Features. Kippel JH, Stone JH, Crofford LJ, White PH, Eds. Primer on the Rheumatic Diseases. 13th Ed. Springer Science, New York: 2008.

        22. Gerss J, Roth J, Holzinger D, Ruperto N, Wittkowski H, et al. Phagocyte-specific S100 proteins and high-sensitivity C reactive protein as biomarkers for a risk-adapted treatment to maintain remission in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a comparative study. Ann Rheum Dis. 2012 Dec. 71(12):1991-7. [Medline].

        23. Johnson K, Gardner-Medwin J. Childhood arthritis: classification and radiology. Clin Radiol. 2002 Jan. 57(1):47-58. [Medline].

        24. McHugh K, Gupta R, Murray K. Imaging in juvenile chronic arthritis. Imaging. 1999. 11:91-7:

        25. Arthritis Curehow to Arthritis Cure for Pedersen TK, Küseler A, Gelineck J, Herlin T. A prospective study of magnetic resonance and radiographic imaging in relation to symptoms and clinical findings of the temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. J Rheumatol. 2008 Aug. 35(8):1668-75. [Medline].

        26. Gylys-Morin VM. MR imaging of pediatric musculoskeletal inflammatory and infectious disorders. Magn Reson Imaging Clin N Am. 1998 the 1 last update 2020/05/25 Aug. 6(3):537-59. [Medline]. Gylys-Morin VM. MR imaging of pediatric musculoskeletal inflammatory and infectious disorders. Magn Reson Imaging Clin N Am. 1998 Aug. 6(3):537-59. [Medline].

        27. Workie DW, Graham TB, Laor T, Rajagopal A, O''s Disease. J Pediatr. 2018 Oct. 201:166-175.e3. [Medline].

        28. De Benedetti F, Brunner HI, Ruperto N, Kenwright A, Wright S, Calvo I, et al. Randomized trial of tocilizumab in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. N Engl J Med. 2012 Dec 20. 367(25):2385-95. [Medline].

        29. Arthritis Curehow to Arthritis Cure for Efficacy and safety of tocilizumab in patients with systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (sJIA): 12-week data from the phase 3 TENDER trial. Abstract presented on June 18, 2010. Available at http://) http://www.roche.com/investors/ir_update/inv-update-2010-10-18.htm.

        30. Lowes R. FDA approves Ilaris for rare juvenile arthritis. Medscape Medical News. May 10, 2013. [Full Text].

        31. Ruperto N, Brunner HI, Quartier P, Constantin T, Wulffraat N, Horneff G, et al. Two randomized trials of canakinumab in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. N Engl J Med. 2012 Dec 20. 367(25):2396-406. [Medline].

        32. Otten MH, Prince FH, Armbrust W, et al. Factors associated the 1 last update 2020/05/25 with treatment response to etanercept in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. JAMA. 2011 Dec 7. 306(21):2340-7. [Medline]. Otten MH, Prince FH, Armbrust W, et al. Factors associated with treatment response to etanercept in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. JAMA. 2011 Dec 7. 306(21):2340-7. [Medline].

        33. Janeczko L. Children With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis May Benefit From Fitted Foot Orthoses. Medscape [serial online]. Available at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/823449. Accessed: April 14, 2014.

        34. Arthritis Curehow to Arthritis Cure for Constantin T, Foeldvari I, Anton J, et al. Consensus-based recommendations for the management of uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: the SHARE initiative. Ann Rheum Dis. 2018 Aug. 77 (8):1107-1117. [Medline].

        35. Ramanan AV, Dick AD, Jones AP, McKay A, Williamson PR, Compeyrot-Lacassagne S, et al. Adalimumab plus Methotrexate for Uveitis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. N Engl J Med. 2017 Apr 27. 376 (17):1637-1646. [Medline].

        36. American College of Rheumatology, Section on Pediatric Rheumatology. Position statement: guidelines for referral of children and adolescents to pediatric rheumatologists. Available at http://www.rheumatology.org/sections/pediatric/ped_referral.pdf. Accessed: November 11, 1997.

        37. Actemra (tocilizumab) prescribing information [package insert]. South San Francisco, CA: Genentech, Inc. April 2013. Available at [Full Text].

        Media Gallery for 1 last update 2020/05/25
        • Patient with active polyarticular arthritis. Note swelling (effusions) of all proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints in addition to boney overgrowth. Also note lack of distal interphalangeal joint (DIP) involvement. The patient has interosseus muscle wasting (observed on the dorsum of the hands), and subluxation and ulnar deviation of the wrists are present. Image courtesy of Barry L. Myones, MD.
        • Wrist radiographs of the patient with active polyarticular arthritis shown in Media file 2. Note severe loss of cartilage in the intercarpal spaces and the radiocarpal space of the right wrist. A large erosion is present in the articular surface of the ulnar epiphysis. The view of the left wrist shows boney ankylosis involving the lateral 4 carpal bones with sparing of the pisiform. Erosions are present in the distal radius and ulna. Almost a loss of cartilage has occurred between the radius and ulna and the carpus. Narrowing of the carpal/metacarpal joints is present. Image courtesy of Barry L. Myones, MD.
        • Close-up of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) effusions in the patient with active polyarthritis shown in Media files 2 and 3. Synovial thickening and effusion, as well as boney overgrowth, are present at the PIP joints bilaterally. Image courtesy of Barry L. Myones, MD.
        • Patient with inactive polyarticular arthritis. Long-term sequelae of polyarticular disease includes joint subluxation (note both wrists and thumbs), joint contractures (at proximal interphalangeal joints [PIPs] and distal interphalangeal joints [DIPs]), boney overgrowth (at all PIPs), and finger deformities (eg, swan-neck or boutonniere deformities). Image courtesy of Barry L. Myones, MD.
        • Hand and wrist radiographs of the patient with inactive polyarticular arthritis shown in Media file 5. Long-term sequelae of polyarticular disease includes periarticular osteopenia, generalized increase in the size of epiphyses, accelerated bone age, narrowed joint spaces (especially at the fourth and fifth proximal interphalangeal joints [PIPs] bilaterally), boutonniere deformities (at left third and fourth interphalangeal joints), and medial subluxation of the first metacarpophalangeal joints (MCPs) bilaterally. Flattening and erosion of the radial carpal articular surface is present in both wrists. Mild narrowing of the joint spaces exists at the carpometacarpal joints and intercarpal rows bilaterally, with sclerotic change of the intercarpal row (right > left). The trapezium and trapezoid may be fused bilaterally. Image courtesy of Barry L. Myones, MD.
        • Sequelae of chronic anterior uveitis. Note the posterior synechiae (weblike attachments of the pupillary margin to the anterior lens capsule) of the right eye secondary to chronic anterior uveitis. This patient has a positive antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) and initially had a pauciarticular course of her arthritis. She now has polyarticular involvement but no active uveitis. Image courtesy of Carlos A. Gonzales, MD.
        • One set of suggested algorithms for the treatment of patients with juvenile arthritis. This should not be considered dogmatic because treatment is not standardized and remains empiric and, at times, controversial.
        • Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) rash.
        • Child with pericardial effusion due to systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).
        • Flexion and extension views of C-spine in child with poorly controlled polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).
        • Temporal-mandibular joint (TMJ) MRI postgadolinium infusion. Abnormal increased uptake indicative of synovitis in child with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).
        • Eighteen-month-old girl with arthritis in her right knee. Note the flexion contracture of that knee.
        • Ankylosis in the cervical spine at several levels due to long-standing juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (also known as juvenile idiopathic arthritis).
        • Widespread osteopenia, carpal crowding (due to cartilage loss), and several erosions affecting the carpal bones and metacarpal heads in particular in a child with advanced juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (also known as juvenile idiopathic arthritis).
        • (A) T2-weighted MRI shows high signal in both hips, which may be due to hip effusions or synovitis. High signal intensity in the left femoral head indicates avascular necrosis. (B) Coronal fat-saturated gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MRI shows bilateral enhancement in the hips. This indicated bilateral active synovitis, which is most pronounced on the right. Because the image was obtained with fat saturation, the hyperintensity in both hips is pathologic, reflecting an inflamed pannus.
        of 15
        Tables
        Contributor Information and Disclosures
        Author

        David D Sherry, MD Chief, Rheumatology Section, Director, Amplified Musculoskeletal Pain Program, The Children''s Hospital Boston

        Mininder S Kocher, MD, MPH is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American College of Sports Medicine, Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America, American Association for the History of Medicine, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, Massachusetts Medical Society

        Disclosure: Received consulting fee from Smith & Nephew Endoscopy for consulting; Received consulting fee from EBI Biomet for consulting; Received consulting fee from OrthoPediatrics for consulting; Received stock from Pivot Medical for consulting; Received consulting fee from pediped for consulting; Received royalty from WB Saunders for none; Received stock from Fixes-4-Kids for consulting.

        Chief Editor

        Lawrence K Jung, MD Chief, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Children''proxima_nova_rgregular'}.truste-banner a:link{color:#007cb0}.truste-banner a:hover{color:#005b81}@media screen and (max-width:790px){.truste-button2{position:absolute;top:20px}.truste-messageColumn,.truste-cookie-link{font-size:16px}#truste-cookie-button{font-size:18px}}